A shift to the Linux app store experience

A shift to the Linux app store experience

Linux software developers historically have faced a number of challenges including fragmentation, distribution complexity and a lack of metrics into the success of their applications. Once an application is built, the journey does not end there – for companies and individual developers creating apps, thought needs to be given to promoting their software for maximum visibility, usage and customer experience.

Applications within the ‘Featured’ section of Linux app stores can see up to 40% install growth within two weeks of being featured.

Self-contained application formats like AppImage, Flatpak and snaps and the shift to an application store model offer a viable, data-driven alternative to the classic methods. This new approach can help overcome some of the historical challenges while improving visibility to enterprises and end users.

This whitepaper will take a closer look at how software developers targeting the desktop market, in particular, can benefit from moving their applications to a Linux app store including:

  • An evaluation of the packaging formats, distributions and considerations that software developers should review.
  • The adoption of application stores: how software developers can maximise their presence and apply lessons from other industries.
  • A series of case studies highlighting successful apps that have an optimised store presence including Spotify, Visual Studio Code and Skype.

To view the whitepaper, fill out the following form:

A shift to the Linux app store experience

Linux software developers historically have faced a number of challenges including fragmentation, distribution complexity and a lack of metrics into the success of their applications. Once an application is built, the journey does not end there – for companies and individual developers creating apps, thought needs to be given to promoting their software for maximum […]

The post A shift to the Linux app store experience appeared first on Ubuntu Blog.

Getting started with AI

Getting started with Artificial Intelligence

From the smallest startups to the largest enterprises alike, organisations are using Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to make the best, fastest, most informed decisions to overcome their biggest business challenges.

But with AI/ML complexity spanning infrastructure, operations, resources, modelling and compliance and security, while constantly innovating, many organizations are left unsure how to capture their data and get started on delivering AI technologies and methodologies.

Now is the time to take the plunge. Whether on-prem or in the cloud, you can establish an AI strategy that connects to your business case, forming a scalable AI solution that is focused on your particular data streams.

Whitepaper highlights:

  • Key concepts in AI/ML
  • Factors to consider and pitfalls to avoid
  • Roles, skill sets and expertise needed for success
  • Infrastructure and applications for multi-cloud operations for the full AI stack
  • Building a readiness plan to deliver AI insights powered by your data: discovery, assessment, design, implementation and operation and feedback

To view the whitepaper complete the form below:

Getting started with AI

From the smallest startups to the largest enterprises alike, organisations are using Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to make the best, fastest, most informed decisions to overcome their biggest business challenges. But with AI/ML complexity spanning infrastructure, operations, resources, modelling and compliance and security, while constantly innovating, many organizations are left unsure how to capture […]

The post Getting started with AI appeared first on Ubuntu Blog.

How to build a lightweight system container cluster

LXD, the system container manager, developed by Canonical and shipped by default with Ubuntu, makes it possible to create many containers of various Linux distributions and manage them in a way similar to virtual machines (VMs) but with lower overhead costs associated with them. Unlike VMs, containers have the benefit of using a shared kernel […]

The post How to build a lightweight system container cluster appeared first on Ubuntu Blog.

How to build a lightweight system container cluster

LXD, the system container manager, developed by Canonical and shipped by default with Ubuntu, makes it possible to create many containers of various Linux distributions and manage them in a way similar to virtual machines (VMs) but with lower overhead costs associated with them. Unlike VMs, containers have the benefit of using a shared kernel […]

The post How to build a lightweight system container cluster appeared first on Ubuntu Blog.

The DevOps guide to IoT projects

Traditional development methods do not scale into the IoT sphere. Strong inter-dependencies and blurred boundaries among components in the edge device stack result in fragmentation, slow updates, security issues, increased cost, and reduced reliability of platforms. This reality places a major strain on IoT players who need to contend with varying cycles and priorities in […]

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